My advice to future editors

3 things I wish I would have known before becoming an editor-in-chief of a yearbook

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My advice to future editors

Photo by William Love

Photo by William Love

Photo by William Love


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EDITOR’S NOTE: Madie Slaton-Sanford is a senior at Sandpoint High School and Editor-in-Chief of the Monticola yearbook.

1. BEING AN EDITOR DOES NOT COME WITH A WRITTEN JOB DESCRIPTION

Just because a teacher may say that you have certain tasks you need to do doesn’t mean you won’t need to take over something else.

When I began my role as EIC, I had no idea I was going to be taking photos, organizing club pictures, sending out billing statements, and designing mods. Being in charge of the yearbook might mean making sacrifices and doing things for the better of the staff and school, whether it is desirable or not.

Before accepting the position as editor, remember that it may take a lot more time than you expect, and you need to be willing to commit that time to complete your book because the entire school is counting on you.

2. YOU DON’T HAVE TO HAVE EVERYTHING FIGURED OUT

My main goal as editor was to figure out everything. I wanted to know exactly what theme we would be working with, what fundraisers we would lead, who would be in what group, and what the ladder was going to look like.

However, now that the end of the year has arrived, I realize that it may not have been so bad to leave a few things up in the air. After I thought I had determined all aspects of the book and class, I ended up having to change most of what I thought was “set in stone”, which just created more work.

Don’t feel like you need to have everything 100 percent decided, but rather, just get an idea of things but don’t stress yourself out over it!

3. WHATEVER YOU WANT YOUR STAFF TO DO, YOU NEED TO DO, TOO

After trying many new things for my yearbook staff, I recognized that whatever I wanted the rest of my staff to do, I had to be willing to do it as well.

This is very important to keep in mind, especially as you’re asking them to go sell ads, stay late for deadlines, and to take pictures at every home event.

It can become very easy to delegate jobs and forget that they may have other things to do as well. Yes, yearbook is either a class or club and while equally important, students may have other commitments.

Basically, when you go to tell someone that they need to cancel their plans and go to the track meet, ask yourself, would I be willing to drop my plans to take pictures?

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1 Comment

One Response to “My advice to future editors”

  1. Michelle Harmon on May 20th, 2015 6:00 am

    Madie, this is such good advice. I will pas this along to my next Editor-in-Chief! Mrs. Harmon, newspaper adviser.

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